Intro to Fight Choreography (with Yung Lee)

Taught By:

Lauren Haroutunian

Description:

Yung Lee (also known as GakAttack) is an awesome action designer and friend of RocketJump, and has worked closely with Lauren and Clint to film some sweet action scenes for us. So with Yung’s help, we determined some basic building blocks for creative Action Design...and this is just to get us started.

Lesson Plan

Yung Lee (also known as GakAttack!) is an action designer and friend of RocketJump, and has worked closely with Lauren and Clint to film some sweet action scenes for us.

So with Yung’s help, we determined some basic building blocks for creative Action Design.

The Official Study Guide

(Download a printable version!)

#1) PACING

  • Let your fight scene have a rhythm.
    • Yung often listens to certain songs while he is rehearsing to get a rhythm for a scene.
  • The tone of your film you are creating will ultimately affect your pacing.
    • fast and frenetic, or slow and dramatic
    • non­stop onslaught, or clear pauses and breaks
    • constant rhythm or varying speeds
  • Decide what pacing will best fit your story and characters.
    • Example: Jackie Chan movies have room built­in for comedic beats and reactions for his character.

#2) PERFORMANCE

  • Your characters’ personalities will not only determine their fighting style, but how they approach obstacles and react to situations.
  • The actor’s performance can sell the believability of a fight.

#3) A REASON TO FIGHT

  • An action scene has the same purpose as any other scene: it must advance the story.
    • Your protagonist has an ultimate goal, and has to overcome obstacles to do it.
    • There is character progression throughout.
  • The scene needs to lead to something; have a driving force behind it.
  • It doesn’t have to be REALISTIC, but it does have to be BELIEVABLE.

#4) CAMERA MOVEMENT

  • Determine choreography with camera.
  • Follow the action:
    • Stay with your subject; move when they move; stop when they stop (most of the time).
    • In other words: camera should be motivated by the action happening in the scene; it should have a reason to happen.
  • Emphasize movement!
    • Follow and highlight big movements and hits to emphasize them and make them feel bigger.

Wait there was a video where Freddie wore khakis while fighting bad guys with an umbrella? Yep! Checkout "London Brawling"!

Extra special thanks to Yung Lee! Check him out on youtube.com/GakAttack and twitter.com/iamgak!

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